Classical Languages

Latin I (9th grade)

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to Latin and the ancient world in which it was spoken. The four major components of the course are vocabulary, grammar, readings, and culture. Much effort will be expended on the vocabulary core of two hundred and fifty words and the English words derived from them. We will also learn how Latin words fit together by mastering a set of endings for nouns, adjectives, and verbs. We will read a continuous narrative about a Roman family that lived in 80 AD and travel with them on a series of adventures in both Rome and Italy. Each chapter will also feature some aspect of Roman culture, such as the family, their summer house and farm, and their stories, gods, slaves, and kings. Students will be expected to write, record, and quiz themselves on Latin vocabulary and English derivatives after every class. Frequent check‐up quizzes will be given without notice. A written test will usually be given at the end of every chapter. A mini‐project will be assigned in the first semester and a major project in the second.

Latin II (10th grade)

The purpose of this course is to give you a basic knowledge of Latin and the ancient world in which it was spoken. The four major components of the course are vocabulary, grammar, readings, and culture. Much effort will be expended on the vocabulary core of over five hundred words and the English words derived from them. We will also learn how Latin words fit together by mastering all the forms of nouns, the indicative, imperative, infinitive, and participial forms of verbs, and personal, relative, and demonstrative pronouns. We will read a continuous narrative about an ancient family and return with them to Rome in 80 AD. Each chapter will also feature some aspect of Roman culture, including the family, the townhouse, vehicles, heroes, colonies, aqueducts, chariot races, hairstyles, and recipes. Students will be expected to write, record, and quiz themselves on Latin vocabulary and English derivatives after every class. Frequent check‐up quizzes will be given without notice. A written test will usually be given at the end of every chapter. A mini‐project will be assigned in the first semester and a major project in the second.

Latin III (11th grade)

In this course students will continue to develop their understanding of Latin vocabulary and grammar. They will acquire a familiarity with the language through careful and methodical repetition and practice. In the third year of study, more emphasis will be placed on learning to translate and analyze Latin poetry and prose. They will not merely reiterate their previously acquired foundational knowledge; in the third year of study, more emphasis will be placed on learning to read and analyze Latin poetry and prose. Students continue to study Roman culture, history, and mythology. They will encounter the works of famous authors such as Ovid, Catullus, and Vergil. Rather than focusing just on translation, students will be asked to draw connections between texts and historical context, language and literary meaning, and linguistic devices and modern English. Consequently, students will build confidence in abilities and will gain a deeper appreciation of the Latin language and Roman culture‐‐both of which led to the development of their own language and culture.

Latin IV (12th grade)

Upon entering this final year of Latin study, students already have a wealth of knowledge regarding Latin vocabulary, grammar, history, and culture. They will begin the course by completing their study of Latin grammar. Throughout the year, they will encounter unaltered Latin texts by authors such as Petronius, Cicero, Catullus, and Pliny. They will read and consider these texts as both a literary and historical source of Roman history. They will focus on the practice of translation, specifically utilizing their knowledge of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. This course will enable students to put into practice all of the skills they have developed throughout their study of Latin. It will also open up conversation about the general art of translation; students will consider the practical issues faced by a translator and will develop an appreciation for the linguistic and cultural discrepancies for which a translator must account. Students will be encouraged to find solutions for these translational problems themselves by means of their own knowledge of the language and by gaining a greater understanding of Roman At the end of the year, as a culmination of four years of language study, students will collaborate on a creative, linguistic project.

Greek I (11th grade)

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to ancient Greek and the world in which it was spoken. The four major components of the course are vocabulary, grammar, readings, and culture. Much effort will be expended on the vocabulary core of over three hundred words and the English words derived from them. We will also learn how Greek words fit together by mastering the forms of nouns and adjectives of three declensions, and the present indicative, imperative, and infinitive forms of verbs, and personal, interrogative, and indefinite adjectives. We will read the first half of a continuous narrative about an ancient family in Athens in 432 BC. Each chapter will also feature an aspect of Greek culture, including agriculture, slavery, women, religion, mythology, epic poetry, and the city of Athens. Students will be expected to write, record, and quiz themselves on Greek vocabulary and English derivatives after every class. Frequent check‐up quizzes will be given without notice. A written test will usually be given at the end of every chapter. A project will be assigned each semester.

Greek II (12th grade)

The purpose of this course is to give you a basic knowledge of ancient Greek and the world in which it was spoken. The four major components of the course are vocabulary, grammar, readings, and culture. Much effort will be expended on the vocabulary core of six hundred fifty words and the English words derived from them. We will also learn how Greek words fit together by mastering all the forms of nouns and adjectives, including comparatives and superlatives, the present and aorist indicative, imperative, infinitive, and participial forms of verbs, and personal, relative, and demonstrative pronouns. We will read the second half of a continuous narrative about an ancient family in 431 BC. Each chapter will also feature some aspect of Greek culture, including the geography and history of Athens, festivals, medicine, trade, travel, and the war with Persia. Students will be expected to write, record, and quiz themselves on Greek vocabulary and English derivatives after every class. Frequent check‐up quizzes will be given without notice. A written test will usually be given at the end of every chapter.